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French film 'A Prophet' to get English-language remake

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A Prophet
Roger Arpajou

Sony Pictures Entertainment has optioned the rights to create an English-language remake of the Cannes Grand Prix-winning French crime drama A Prophet.

Director Jacques Audiard’s (Rust & Bone) story of a young Algerian man (Tahar Rahim) who gets involved with a ruthless band of mobsters was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the 2010 Oscars, but lost the prize to Spain’s The Secret in Their Eyes. In the press release announcing the news, Neal Moritz, who will be producing the remake alongside Toby Jaffe for Original Film, said: “This is an epic crime saga with compelling characters and original storytelling. I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to make an English language version of the film and I am grateful to have the trust of Jacques Audiard and his producers, as well as the writers Thomas Bidegain, Nicolas Peufaillit, and Abdel Raouf Dafri.”

With an estimated production budget of $13 million,  Sony Pictures Classics released the original film in the US a weekend prior to the 2010 Academy Awards. The limited release run went on to gross $2.1 million domestically for a worldwide total of $17.9 million. But this move is more about story than anything else.

“We think A Prophet will translate perfectly for English-speaking audiences.  Obviously, we love working with Neal and he has a great track record with this kind of film – we’re confident that our film will excite audiences in the same way that the original material did,” said Hannah Minghella, the President of Production for Columbia Pictures, and daughter of the late English Patient director Anthony Minghella.

There’s no word yet on who might direct or star in the remake.

Here’s the trailer for the original film.

Follow Lindsey on Twitter: @ldbahr

Read More: 

EW Review: ‘A Prophet

EW Review: ‘Rust and Bone’

Cannes Report: Roger Ebert, ‘A Prophet,’ and a trend that ought to end