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Movies: April 5, 2013

Other movies out this week

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Admission
PG-13, 1 HR., 47 MINS.

A campus comedy that crackles with the sound of clever people trying to outtalk each other. Tina Fey plays a Princeton admissions officer, and Paul Rudd is a teacher at an alternative high school. BOwen Gleiberman

Blancanieves
PG-13, 1 hr., 44 Mins.

If The Artist primed your palate for silent film, you’re in luck. Spanish director Pablo Berger has crafted a darkly lyrical riff on Snow White with Macarena García as the orphaned daughter of a famous toreador and Y Tu Mamá También‘s Maribel Verdú as her wickedly sexy stepmother. The black-and-white movie is easy on the eyes, but could’ve used a splash of Jean Dujardin’s sly fizz. BChris Nashawaty

The Call
R, 1 HR., 35 MINS.

A 911 operator (Halle Berry) attempts to save the life of a kidnapped teen (Abigail Breslin). It’s good, gruesome fun. BClark Collis

The Croods
PG, 1 HR., 36 MINS.

A young cavegirl (voiced by Emma Stone) and her embarrassing family join up with the more evolved Guy (Ryan Reynolds) to escape the breakup of Pangaea. C+Keith Staskiewicz

Gimme the Loot
NOT RATED, 1 HR., 21 MINS.

Adam Leon’s live-wire drama about two teenage graffiti artists has an incisive, street-smart verve. Ty Hickson, as the budding player Malcolm, is cool, clownish, sincere, and imposing. And Tashiana Washington, as his partner in crime, has a vivid fury. (Also available on VOD) B+Owen Gleiberman

Ginger & Rosa
PG-13, 1 HR., 30 MINS.

Sally Potter’s touching drama set in 1962 London follows the tenderhearted Ginger (Elle Fanning) and her wild best pal, Rosa (Alice Englert). B+Melissa Maerz

Mental
NOT RATED, 1 HR., 56 MINS.

In his semi-autobiographical tale of insanity, family bonds, and The Sound of Music, Aussie director P.J. Hogan tries for the same wistful kookiness that made Muriel’s Wedding a hit. When their mother has a breakdown, the five Moochmore girls are stuck with their gruff politician father (Anthony LaPaglia). To the rescue comes Toni Collette as Shaz, a nonconformist nanny who teaches the girls to vent their fury. She’s Maria von Trapp with a knife. (Also available on VOD) B-Owen Gleiberman

My Amityville Horror
NOT RATED, 1 HR., 28 MINS.

Who knew that one haunted house could cast such a long shadow? The infamous Long Island residence of the title has inspired a bunch of mediocre fright flicks. Now it’s inspired a mediocre documentary, mainly comprising Daniel Lutz’s reflections on living at 112 Ocean Avenue as a kid. Today he’s in his mid-40s, and he has a whopper of a ghost story to share. Too bad we already know it by heart. (Also available on VOD) B-Chris Nashawaty

Olympus Has Fallen
R, 1 HR., 59 MINS.

In Antoine Fuqua’s brutally rote Die Hard-in-the-White-House thriller, North Korean terrorists capture the White House and take the president (Aaron Eckhart) hostage. COwen Gleiberman

Oz the Great and Powerful
PG, 2 HRS., 7 MINS.

Sam Raimi’s 3-D fairy tale takes us back over the rainbow. The film looks terrific, but James Franco is all wrong as the charlatan magician of the title. C+Chris Nashawaty

Renoir
R, 1 HR., 51 MINS.

A film about the titular impressionist master had better look gorgeous — and thanks to lush shots of sloping meadows and nubile bodies, it does. Unfortunately, the narrative has the energy of one of Renoir’s most languidly reclining nudes. A free-spirited model (Christa Théret) arrives at Renoir’s French Riviera estate, bringing a final burst of inspiration to the elderly artist (Michel Bouquet). Strong performances and visuals give the film its color, but this slow-drying painting needs darker dramatic lines. BStephan Lee

Spring Breakers
R, 1 HR., 32 MINS.

Four college women (led by Vanessa Hudgens and Selena Gomez) go on a psychotic spring-break bender. A-Owen Gleiberman

Welcome to the Punch
NOT RATED, 1 HR., 39 MINS.

James McAvoy does his best Jason Statham impersonation as a high-strung London cop haunted by a crook who once slipped through his fingers (Mark Strong). Problem is, McAvoy’s too interesting for such a routine genre shoot-’em-up. The film is perked up by a few slo-mo volleys of ultraviolence, and it has style to burn (every shot has the steel blue hue of a Michelob ad), but if you’ve seen one copper-chasing-his-white-whale flick, you’ve seen ’em all. (Available on VOD 3/30) B-Chris Nashawaty