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Feedback: March 22, 2013

You talked, we listened!

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We’re Off to See the Wizard…
Thanks, EW, for your acknowledgment of the Michigan Motion Picture Studios, at which Oz the Great and Powerful was filmed. While I am in no way connected to the industry, I’m a lifelong Michigan resident who’s grateful to the people trying to build the foundation for a long-term, viable film industry in our state. There will never be another Hollywood, but Michigan’s diverse climates, landscapes, and cultures provide countless options for filmmakers.—Loren Sztajer, Troy, Mich.

As a longtime Wizard of Oz aficionado, I appreciated the timeline of Oz productions over the past century. I would like to add one more: The Dreamer of Oz, a 1990 TV movie about L. Frank Baum starring John Ritter as the famed storyteller, who took the fantasies he used to tell his children and wove them into the magical novels we have all come to love.—Paul Auger, Claremont, N.H.

Oscar Postmortem
Thank you for pointing out in your Oscars coverage why the orchestra was not in the same building as the actual show. Regardless of the scope and staging of the musical numbers, I find that very disrespectful toward the musicians who I’m sure also worked extremely hard in preparation for the telecast. Next year the producers should have all of the musical performances be a cappella — maybe then they would realize the importance of the orchestra.—Brian Gross, Allentown, Pa.

Why was there an Oscar celebration of 50 years of James Bond with no onstage reunion of all the actors who’ve played the spy? —Matt Campbell, Groveport, Ohio

The editors respond…
We’ll let Oscar producer Craig Zadan answer that question: ”The concept of the evening was music in the movies. So our celebration of Bond was celebrating through the music, and we had Shirley Bassey from day one. And we thought [about] the impact of having Shirley Bassey at the age of 76…also sounding the way she did in the ’60s…. So we wanted to do a clip package that was sort of an introduction to her entrance…. There was never a plan to reunite the Bonds.”

Right on Target
This issue proved how much I value my subscription to EW! The week I decided to look for the song in the Target commercial, you delivered it to my door with ”What’s That Song? TV Ad Edition” (Music), proving your touch with pop culture. So with Greg Holden’s ”She’s Got Something” playing in the background, I write: Thank you, EW!—Pamela Giardiello, Longmont, Colo.

Lee’s Shining Moment
Where was the photo of Ang Lee in your post-Oscar issue? His award was one of the most deserved of the night — it was telling that the audience gave him a standing O! His direction of Life of Pi will be remembered long after this year’s Oscars. —David Low, Middletown, Conn.

Which Witch is Witch?
Shannon T. Nutt of Pittsburgh writes: ”What gives, EW? You go out of your way in your Oz the Great and Powerful feature not to reveal the identity of the Wicked Witch of the West, but then you put the actress on your cover! Did you really think people wouldn’t be able to recognize her?”

The editors respond… We picked the Wicked Witch of the West for the cover because she’s the coolest icon from the movie. At press time, the filmmakers implored us not to ”spoil” things by naming the actress. That surprised us because the cast and crew had talked openly about it for months — and yeah, if you even look at the WWW in the ads, it’s pretty obvious who plays her. (James Franco, right?) But we played along, partly for the sake of younger readers. By now you know it’s not actually a pivotal surprise in the movie, but we’re glad we took the high road. Wouldn’t want anyone to think we’re…wicked.