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Wonder Woman bound for the big screen?

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She has all the accoutrements of a classic superhero: incredible strength, twisty backstory, nifty uniform. (Not to mention bulletproof bracelets.) But despite the hopes of the countless fans she’s collected over seven decades, there’s one power that has always eluded Wonder Woman: the ability to carry her own movie.

Now, though, following the success of Marvel’s The Avengers, Warner Bros. and its subsidiary DC Comics have revived a decadelong effort to make a Wonder Woman movie, reportedly hiring Michael Goldenberg (who co-wrote last year’s Green Lantern) to pen a new script. The move is part of a broader push toward a DC superhero team-up movie that would unite Wonder Woman with Justice League cohorts like Batman and Superman. ”The prospects have never been better,” says screenwriter Matthew Jennison, who’s not involved with the current project but co-wrote a Wonder Woman script in 2007. ”I’m extremely hopeful.”

There are still hurdles, of course — witness David E. Kelley‘s failed effort to launch a new Wonder Woman TV series last year. The character’s Greek-mythology origin story has always been a tough nut to crack. The 1970s Wonder Woman TV series left behind a campy aura. And as Joss Whedon, who tried in vain to make a Wonder Woman movie before moving on to direct The Avengers, told EW in 2010, ”She’s a girl. Hollywood is still twitchy about that.”

But in the wake of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and The Hunger Games — two recent pop culture juggernauts spearheaded by tenacious female characters — that twitchiness may finally be ebbing. ”Success speaks volumes,” says Hunger Games producer Nina Jacobson. ”The bias that men won’t go see movies with a woman starring in it is being broken down. It’s a lot of hooey, frankly.” In other words, when it comes to the movies, Wonder Woman may not be as invisible as her jet for much longer. (Additional reporting by Karen Valby)

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