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Can Josh Schwartz finally make a young D.C.-set drama work?

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Image Credit: Ocean/Corbis; Larry Busacca/Getty ImagesChuck‘s Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage, who’ve made Orange County and New York City young and sexy with The O.C. and Gossip Girl, are heading to D.C. for their next venture — an untitled pilot at ABC that, according to Variety, centers on twentysomething roommates who “juggle their personal and professional lives in Washington” and “find that the ideals that brought them to D.C. don’t always match with the realities of living in the nation’s capital.” If it sounds familiar, you’re probably thinking back to 2000’s D.C., The WB’s short-lived Capitol Hill intern drama from Law & Order creator Dick Wolf and Go writer John August that starred Mark-Paul Gosselaar, Jacinda Barrett, and Daniel Sunjata. “That might have been a little bit before its time,” Gosselaar told EW while looking back on his career in 2008. “‘It’s one of the most frustrating things, because you figure as an equation, the sum should equal this [meaning success]. And when it doesn’t, you’re goin’, How did that go wrong?…I just know that it wasn’t going well. And once a show doesn’t go well, you feel like the writers aren’t writing the way they want to, they’re writing to get ratings.”

Can Schwartz and Savage, who’ve hired Remember Me screenwriter Will Fetters to pen the script, avoid suffering the same fate? They’ve definitely got the ability to zero in on a culture and put juicy backstabbing moments onscreen. You might want them to bring out the claws and sex it up, but I’m actually hoping for a tone more like The Good Wife — where the characters actually behave like normal people you could imagine encountering in your lifetime. It doesn’t make them boring (case in point: Archie Panjabi’s Emmy win for sexy boot-wearing Kalinda), it just makes them real. They can fight and flirt, and we’re invested. What do you think it will take to make a D.C.-set drama about twentysomethings work? A burgeoning romance with a superior is a given.