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'Hawaii Five-O': Grace Park takes a man-made role

Plus ”Inception,” the Old Spice guy, and more stuff we’re buzzing about on EW.com

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You know you’ve broken into the boys’ club when you can’t seem to stop taking roles originally played by guys. Grace Park first gained attention while playing Lieut. Sharon ”Boomer” Valerii in Sci Fi’s remake of Battlestar Galactica. (Boomer from the 1978 series was portrayed by Herbert Jefferson Jr.) And now Park will be pulling the sex swap all over again this fall, as Det. Kono Kalakaua in CBS’ reboot of Hawaii Five-0. (Kono was played by the burly actor Zulu in the 1968 original.) Park attributes all the gender bending not to her special brand of gravitas, but to Hollywood’s zeal for remakes and the need to inject them with modern sensibilities. ”Back in the day, we used to have much more male-centric shows,” she says. ”You still have male-heavy shows, but having a woman in there adds a new dimension.” That said, she sees plenty of ways to exploit this trend: ”My next goal is to do J.R. from Dallas. Then maybe Larry from Three’s Company.” Note to network executives: Please make this happen. — Jennifer Armstrong

TV series that missed their exit cues
Even the best TV shows often hang on past their freshness dates. As the final season of Heroes comes to DVD, we pinpoint when some faves could have quit while they were ahead.

1 Heroes
Season 1: ”Landslide”
Sylar looks out on New York, testing his powers. It’s a thrilling vision of evil, and an encapsulation of everything Heroes did so well…for that first year.

2 24
Season 6: ”9 A.M.-10 A.M.”
Minutes after killing a friend, Jack sees a nuclear bomb go off. The look on his face as he stares at the explosion is unforgettable; later episodes were not.

3 Gilmore Girls
Season 6: ”Partings”
Lorelai winds up in bed with baby-daddy Christopher in the last ep penned by the Palladinos. The show then turned into a bad imitation of itself in its final year. — Darren Franich

Clip of the week: The Old Spice man is a busy guy
When he’s not logrolling or cake baking, he’s answering fans’ queries on the Web. In a series of 180 YouTube videos, Isaiah Mustafa responded to tweets requesting personal messages from people as varied as Alyssa Milano, George Stephanopoulos, and Demi Moore, along with hundreds of regular folks. We asked him if there is anything he can’t do. ”I can’t paint my toenails, study interpretive dance, or attend tea parties with stuffed-animal guests. Oh, and I can’t watch romantic comedies or Elizabethan period pieces, or my eyeballs will fall out of my face. It’s less than desirable, but I’ve learned to accept my weaknesses.” — Kate Ward

Saying goodbye to Captain Phil: A son’s tribute
Witnessing the passing of Capt. Phil Harris on Discovery Channel’s July 13 episode of Deadliest Catch was sad for the record 8.5 million viewers who tuned in, but nothing compared to the heartbreak felt by his two sons, Josh and Jake Harris. Josh spoke to EW.com about missing his dad and the outpouring of support from fans. ”Everybody wants to give you hugs, give their condolences, tell you their stories…. He’s such a good guy, and he had such a big heart. To be in the last moments of your life and think you are a failure just broke my heart. It absolutely crushed me, because he wasn’t a failure at all. He produced two good kids and did the best job he could with the cards he was dealt.” — Lynette Rice

What was the best scene in Inception?
57% The spinning hallway fight in shifting gravity
15% The closing shot of the movie
11% The simultaneous kicks back to the ”real” world
7% Ariadne playing with dream-world ”physics” in her training session
7% Arthur binding the crew together and guiding them to the elevator shaft

For the complete poll results, go to PopWatch

”Stephen Moyer and I laughed so hard in the back of the car — we were almost blowing takes, we were giggling so much — that we actually fell in love. We’re having a bromance.” — Grant Bowler on filming the kidnapping of vampire Bill Compton on True Blood