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Why Did I Get Married Too?

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Tyler Perry, Tyler Perry's Why Did I Get Married Too | WHY DID I GET MARRIED TOO? Janet Jackson as Patricia and Malik Yoba as Gavin
Quantrell Colbert

Tyler Perry's Why Did I Get Married Too

type:
Movie
Current Status:
In Season
mpaa:
PG-13
runtime:
113 minutes
Wide Release Date:
04/02/10
performer:
Tyler Perry, Janet Jackson, Michael Jai White
director:
Tyler Perry
distributor:
Lions Gate Films
author:
Tyler Perry

We gave it a D

So much for the benefits of amateur counseling: Three years after Why Did I Get Married?, in which four African-American couples (and long-time friends) asked that very question at a Colorado resort, Tyler Perry reunites his marital specimens at a Bahamas resort for Why Did I Get Married Too? Apparently these students of pop psychology still don’t know the answer. Instead, they’ve got more problems. Big loud problems. Big loud problems that involve yelling, throwing things, or turning a head away in passive-aggressive anger. Loudest of all is Tasha Smith as Angela, the hectoring, booze-guzzling, cartoon big-mouth convinced that any woman her sportscaster husband (Michael Jai Smith) even lays his eyes on is a ”ho” (her word) with whom he’s cheating on her. Most likely to pretend everything is okay is Janet Jackson as Patricia, the author of self-help books who is equally nuts and prone to smashing up her house of Expensive Glass Items with the aid of her husband’s golf clubs.

If these ladies and their gents ever had valuable lessons to impart about about marriage, commitment, family, and keeping the romantic spark alive in the first movie, they’ve lost their authority in this trite, exhausted sequel. It’s a contradiction in terms to think of the phenomenally successful, prolific entertainment showman Tyler Perry as lazy, but there’s no other description for this particular product: Terribly shot and crudely assembled, WDIGMT? serves up speeches about trust and fidelity and rolling with the punches and blah blah blah. But it does so with so little energy that the actors might as well be saying the words blah blah blah. D