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Guilty Pleasures Reality TV Showdown: 'Bromance' vs. 'Tool Academy'

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Tool Academy

PopWatch is on a quest to determine the Greatest Guilty Pleasure Reality TV Show of All Time. We have 32 seeded contestants in four categories (see full bracket here), and we’re finishing the quarterfinals in the Competition category. After you vote, please leave comments about why you love the show you chose.

Quarterfinals, Competition: Bromance vs. Tool Academy

Bromance

Few vanity reality shows are as decadent, or as bizarre, as Bromance, the competition to be Brody Jenner’s new best friend. What could’ve been a mere rich-do-play diversion turned into a high-camp mix of macho posturing, socioeconomic striving, and barely-repressed obsession. The contestants don’t even want to be Brody’s friend. They want be Brody: the wealth, the women, the golden-god physique. It’s The Talented Mr. Ripley reimagined as a Frathouse Pledge Week sponsored by MTV. Put simply: Dude, man, guy, bro… y’know? — Darren Franich

Tool Academy

PopWatchers, when I first heard the title, I honestly thought this had to be some kind of home-improvement show on HGTV. How could I be so wrong, there is nothing educational or redeeming about these tools. Although they seem to keep hair gel companies in business, so there is economic stimulation. I love that there’s always someone willing to get tattooed with the Tool Academy logo (shouldn’t that be a warning sign to any future mate!?), and that there are girls who are willing to go on national TV to tell the world how douche-y their boyfriends are. One such esteemed participant is one of the ladies lining up in the Tiger Woods scandal. Thank you girls, for sharing these depths of tool-ness with us in public. As for the men, I love that VH1 gives them an insulting nicknames like Tat-Tool and Tiny Tool and puts them through humiliating tasks like mock funerals. The serious tones of the therapist giving them relationship help only makes Tool Academy more delightfully absurd. — Wendy Mitchell