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A timeline of SNL's f@$!ery

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Jenny-Slate-SNL_l

Jenny-Slate-SNL_lWell that was a frickin’ crazy first day. With barely 20 minutes left in the broadcast, new SNL cast member Jenny Slate did what you oughtn’t to do (but folks do anyway): She dropped the f-bomb. During a sketch about biker chicks with Kristen Wiig and host Megan Fox, Slate slipped and said “I f—ing love you for that,” then had a look on her face like she knew she’d stepped in it. She knew because SNL’s been here before.  (Luckily, NBC says Slate will keep her job.)

Read about other f—ups in SNL history after the jump.

March 15, 1980

Musician Paul Shaffer, in a moment that echoes Slate’s, accidentally said the word during a sketch about being “a flogging musician.” Needless to say, there was no “flogging” (either by Shaffer or on him).

Feb. 21, 1981

The most famous case of SNL f-word slippage (primarily for its consequences) is Charles Rocket’s utterance during a “Who Shot J.R.?” sketch. Rocket was subsequently fired, and didn’t work in television again for three years. Though his career recovered and he went on to have steady television roles throughout his life, Rocket, once considered the next Chevy Chase, continued to struggle personally, eventually committing suicide in 2004.

(video obviously contains strong language)

April 12, 1997

While Shaffer and Slate both slipped during sketches, Norm Macdonald’s unauthorized utterance was of his own accord. During “Weekend Update” he started to make a joke about the opening of a broadcast-journalism museum, but stumbled over the words, remarking “What the f— was that?” He joked seconds later that the evening would be his “farewell performance,” but he was wrong. Macdonald wasn’t fired from the Update anchor chair for another nine months.

But what do you think, PopWatchers? Is dropping the occasional F-bomb a big deal? Should there be more decorum on our airwaves or is the FCC too uptight?