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Sundance: Ben Affleck, Mark Harmon, and the Doors' Ray Manzarek

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Was there too much imbibing at Friday night’s parties? Or perhaps people just needed to sleep off the uber-depressing premiere of Antoine Fuqua’s cop-killer film Brooklyn’s Finest. Whatever the reason, the EW photo suite on Saturday seemed a bit subdued at first. Brooklyn’s star Don Cheadle left snow country all together, while his costar Wesley Snipes arrived hours late to his scheduled shoot. But nothing seemed to stop Ashley Judd, Goran Visnjic, and the rest of the Helen cast from turning up for some positively cheery group photos. And that’s saying a lot considering the crew was here promoting their film centered on a woman’s journey with depression. Director Sandra Nettelbeck (Mostly Martha) was the exception. Maybe the strain of her film — which the cast said was very well-received at its premiere Friday night — was too much too handle, or press is not her thing. Either way, Nettelbeck was downright grumpy. “Well, she’s German,” said a member of the film’s entourage, by way of apology. Luckily, things soon got brighter. Mark Harmon was a complete delight, taking photos with fans, regaling journalists with stories from movies past, and, of course, promoting his happy little Slamdance film Weather Girl. Asked when all the attention becomes horrifying, NCIS’s leading man simply answered, “When you start believing it.” Pause. “They only want you when you’re working.”

Harmon’s treat for being such a good guy was a brief chat with the legendary Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek, who stopped by with his fellow band member Robby Krieger to promote Tom DiCillo’s film, When You’re Strange, which they don’t want to be called a documentary. They say it’s more of a narrative using documentary footage. “No talking heads,” Manzarek said.

The one man who seems to never stop working is the Pulitzer

Prize-winning journalist Nicholas Kristof. Best known for his riveting

columns in The New York Times on the humanitarian crises in Darfur and Congo, Kristof joined the year’s Sundance to promote his new documentary The Reporter

that will air on HBO. Kristof’s struggle to get young people to pay

attention to the troubling issues around the world have led him to a

valuable partnership with director Eric Daniel Metzer and executive

producer Ben Affleck — both on hand at the EW suite. The trio have

created a film that explores Kristof’s dying brand of journalism and

his 2007 trip to Congo. “We got a huge response,” said Affleck of

Friday night’s premiere. “This is not the kind of response you usually

get for political documentaries that are on subjects that are downers.

It’s a testament to the skill of the filmmaking and the charisma and

talent of the subject.” And it helps that a big, fancy movie star like

Affleck is here promoting the film too. “I’m trying to navigate the

world of promotion and publicity and to deal with the humanitarian

world, the filmmaking world and, let’s face it, the world of EW lounge

suites,” Affleck says.

Stay tuned for more details from the EW lounge,

including a wild interview with Guillermo Del Toro, Alfonso Cuaron, and

Gael Garcia Bernal, who popped by to promote their film Rudo y Cursi, and spent most of their time ribbing Del Toro about directing The Hobbit.

The one man who seems to never stop working is the PulitzerPrize-winning journalist Nicholas Kristof. Best known for his rivetingcolumns in The New York Times on the humanitarian crises in Darfur and Congo, Kristof joined the year’s Sundance to promote his new documentary The Reporterthat will air on HBO. Kristof’s struggle to get young people to payattention to the troubling issues around the world have led him to avaluable partnership with director Eric Daniel Metzer and executiveproducer Ben Affleck — both on hand at the EW suite. The trio havecreated a film that explores Kristof’s dying brand of journalism andhis 2007 trip to Congo. “We got a huge response,” said Affleck ofFriday night’s premiere. “This is not the kind of response you usuallyget for political documentaries that are on subjects that are downers.It’s a testament to the skill of the filmmaking and the charisma andtalent of the subject.” And it helps that a big, fancy movie star likeAffleck is here promoting the film too. “I’m trying to navigate theworld of promotion and publicity and to deal with the humanitarianworld, the filmmaking world and, let’s face it, the world of EW loungesuites,” Affleck says.

Stay tuned for more details from the EW lounge,including a wild interview with Guillermo Del Toro, Alfonso Cuaron, andGael Garcia Bernal, who popped by to promote their film Rudo y Cursi, and spent most of their time ribbing Del Toro about directing The Hobbit.