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Jonas Brothers hold on a little bit longer

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The Jonas Brothers’ A Little Bit Longer was true to its title and held on to the top spot of the album chart for a second week. The disc’s dropoff was rather severe: a 72 percent slide, from its boffo opening of 525,000 copies last week (the third-best debut of the year) to just 147,000 this week. But that was still far ahead of the second-place finisher, Kid Rock’s resurgent Rock N Roll Jesus, which sold 101,000 units to move up a spot to No. 2, its highest chart position since last October.

Staind had the week’s best debut, selling 92,000 copies of The Illusion of Progress to come in at No. 3. But progress really does seem to be an illusion for the neo-metal band, at least sales-wise: Their last studio effort debuted with twice as many copies, 185,000, as the new one. Ice Cube also saw his opening figures halved. Raw Footage debuted at No. 5 with 70,000 copies, less than half the 144,000 his previous album entered with two years ago. These disappointing numbers came in just days after the rapper-actor’s latest movie, The Longshots, had a lackluster box-office bow, suggesting a thaw of enthusiasm among both his gangsta and family-friendly constituencies.

Hip-hop duo Schwayze entered at No. 10 with 47,000 units. Coming in at No. 13 was the soundtrack for the Cheetah Girls’ latest Disney Channel movie, One World. That teleflick attracted an impressive 6.2 million viewers when it premiered earlier this month, coming in second only to the Olympics in its time slot. But only 34,000 of those fans rushed out to get the album. The only other debut in the Billboard/Soundscan top 20 belonged to The Academy Is…, whose third album entered at No. 17 with sales of 23,000.

Keep reading to learn about T.I.’s triumph on the singles chart….

Both the digital songs sales chart and Billboard’s Hot 100 had a fresh tune at No. 1 this week, T.I.’s “Whatever You Like,” which bowed with a smashing 205,000 downloads. Pink’s “So What” had the second-highest entry among singles, with 117,000, at No. 4. Metallica’s “Day That Never Comes” entered at No. 18, selling 58,000. Last week’s bestselling single, David Archuleta’s “Crush,” fell to No. 6 with a 46 percent decline.

The biggest sales increase on the digital songs chart was for a controversial cover of Kid Rock’s radio hit “All Summer Long.” The star has famously refused to license his material to iTunes and other download sites, preferring that fans buy the whole album, in physical form. But a mysterious act named Hit Masters, on the equally mysterious Hip Kiddy label, has taken advantage of market hunger for the tune and released a near-soundalike cover version. Their unauthorized “Summer” sold 96,000 downloads this week, a 158 percent increase, which pushed the song up 27 spots to No. 5. But let the buyer beware: The non-Kid Rock version has 1,412 consumer reviews on iTunes, as of this writing—with an average rating of one star.

Both the digital songs sales chart and Billboard’s Hot 100 had a fresh tune at No. 1 this week, T.I.’s “Whatever You Like,” which bowed with a smashing 205,000 downloads. Pink’s “So What” had the second-highest entry among singles, with 117,000, at No. 4. Metallica’s “Day That Never Comes” entered at No. 18, selling 58,000. Last week’s bestselling single, David Archuleta’s “Crush,” fell to No. 6 with a 46 percent decline.The biggest sales increase on the digital songs chart was for a controversial cover of Kid Rock’s radio hit “All Summer Long.” The star has famously refused to license his material to iTunes and other download sites, preferring that fans buy the whole album, in physical form. But a mysterious act named Hit Masters, on the equally mysterious Hip Kiddy label, has taken advantage of market hunger for the tune and released a near-soundalike cover version. Their unauthorized “Summer” sold 96,000 downloads this week, a 158 percent increase, which pushed the song up 27 spots to No. 5. But let the buyer beware: The non-Kid Rock version has 1,412 consumer reviews on iTunes, as of this writing—with an average rating of one star.