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Strike day 4: Stars picket in the Big Apple

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By 11 this morning, Susan Sarandon, Tim Robbins (pictured), Julianne Moore, Joan Allen, Robin Williams, SNL‘s Seth Meyers, David Duchovny, Law & Order: SVU star Chris Meloni, screenwriter Nora Ephron, and Sopranos creator David Chase had all rolled out of bed, layered up for the 40-degree chill, and hit the WGA East picket line in front of the Time Warner center in Columbus Circle. (EW.com is a division of Time Warner.) It was a rare, but invigorating sight: Nobody was done up. No makeup, no hair up-dos, not a Caroline Herrera gown or Armani tux to be seen. Hollywood’s elite came out as simple working professionals fighting for their colleagues. “It’s all connected. I’m supporting my friends,” Allen said from the picket line. “As an

actor, I’d be nowhere without writers.”

Meloni told Hollywood Insider that SVU is currently shooting its last episode even though “it’s not supposed to be our last episode.” He added, “This is it. This is the stand.” Meanwhile, Meyers, an actor-writer, confirmed that Saturday Night Live will go dark this weekend. “I’m sure everybody out here would rather be writing than be out here,” he told us, adding that “we would’ve been happy to scramble and try to put together a show. [We’re] hoping to come back next week, obviously, if this gets resolved.”

Next week sounds a little soon for a resolution, however. “Hopefully,

[the WGA and AMPTP] will go back to the negotiating table,” said

Robbins, “but I don’t think [they’re] going to…. There’s a very, very

strong resolve in the Writers Guild.” Robbins, who is a member of WGA as well as the Screen Actors and Directors Guilds, noted that

whatever the writers end up negotiating will set an important precedent for the SAG and DGA, whose contracts expire in June. “These are very

similar issues regarding new media,” he said.

While the you-know-what has been hitting the fan all week in TV production, things are just starting to get nasty for the film industry. Julianne Moore and Susan

Sarandon, standing by side by side, told Insider that the strike is

already affecting their projects. “Scripts are not ready to go,” Moore

said. “There’s going to be a lot of turmoil, I think.” Sarandon added,

“There are many more projects being pushed for March, for instance —

even January. Suddenly people are trying to make real things [happen] that were

maybe a little iffy.”

Additional reporting by Adam B. Vary

Next week sounds a little soon for a resolution, however. “Hopefully,[the WGA and AMPTP] will go back to the negotiating table,” saidRobbins, “but I don’t think [they’re] going to…. There’s a very, verystrong resolve in the Writers Guild.” Robbins, who is a member of WGA as well as the Screen Actors and Directors Guilds, noted thatwhatever the writers end up negotiating will set an important precedent for the SAG and DGA, whose contracts expire in June. “These are verysimilar issues regarding new media,” he said.

While the you-know-what has been hitting the fan all week in TV production, things are just starting to get nasty for the film industry. Julianne Moore and SusanSarandon, standing by side by side, told Insider that the strike isalready affecting their projects. “Scripts are not ready to go,” Mooresaid. “There’s going to be a lot of turmoil, I think.” Sarandon added,”There are many more projects being pushed for March, for instance —even January. Suddenly people are trying to make real things [happen] that weremaybe a little iffy.”

Additional reporting by Adam B. Vary