Entertainment Weekly

Subscribe

Stay Connected

Subscribe

Advertise With Us

Learn More

Skip to content

Article

Cyber Digest

A weekly spin on the Web

Posted on

Secrets of the IMDB Agents, producers, directors, and actors use the Internet Movie Database (imdb.com) just like the rest of us. But what happens when they don’t like what they find? Although it would violate the company’s privacy policy to name names, according to group product manager Barnaby Dorfman, the mega-guide gets celeb e-mail all the time. Most actors write in with additions to their filmography, but plenty have also tried to shave a few years off their age. And one director recently sicced a lawyer on the company — which was acquired by Amazon.com in 1998 — to get his credit on a film changed to a pseudonym. The baffling part, says Dorfman, is that ”the film has a very high rating on the site.”

Broken Quills The Motion Picture Association of America has requested that Fox Searchlight remove a section of its website for Quills — a film about the salacious novelist Marquis de Sade and, by extension, the importance of freedom of speech. Movie sites generally don’t receive the same scrutiny from the MPAA’s ad-review division as other promo materials, unless, as in this case, a complaint is lodged (the MPAA will not reveal the nature of complaints). One thing that makes the removal ”deliciously ironic,” says Quills writer Doug Wright, is that the offending portion of the site included excerpts of de Sade’s work.

Now You See It AsSeenIn.com started with a simple mission: Sell the goods seen on hit TV shows — the cafĂ© mug from 7th Heaven; the flower-fringed Levi’s worn by Shannen Doherty on Charmed. But where are the teal leather pants seen on Sex and the City‘s Kim Cattrall? AsSeenIn.com’s selection was, until recently, restricted to the shows with which it had scored product placement deals. ”It was very limiting both to us, the shows, and the visitor,” says the company’s exec director of marketing, Christopher Racster. So, starting this month with That ’70s Show, AsSeenIn.com is opening its site to tchotchkes from any show that’s interested. That way, says Racster, ”we’re not stuck having to give preference to anybody.” But the site probably will be stuck with a bunch of out-of-fashion bell-bottoms.