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Here are the three oddest Oscar campaigns

EW.com explains how the makers of ”Chicken Run” and ”Dinosaur” are shaking things up

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Chicken Run

Every Oscar race produces its share of oddball contenders, and this year is hardly low on head scratching ”For Your Consideration” ads in the trades. (The Tommy Lee Jones/ Samuel Jackson thriller ”Rules of Engagement” for Best Picture? Meg Ryan for Best Actress in ”Proof of Life”?) But now the studios have come up with three WAY out there campaigns. Since the guys in Vegas won’t touch these, we’ll set their odds.

”Chicken Run” for Best Costume Design
A wardrobe nomination for a cartoon? Sounds like fowl play. But since the poultry in question were made of clay as opposed to pen and ink, they wore honest to God garments. ”They were made by hand out of specially designed fabric,” says DreamWorks marketing exec Marvin Levy of the flock’s frocks. Eggstroardinary. ODDS 10:1.

”Dinosaur” for Best Visual Effects
The logic is clear enough: If ”Jurassic Park” could pick up this award, why not ”Dinosaur”? Usually, this category rewards films with impressive special effects sequences; in this case, wasn’t all of Disney’s CGI adventure a visual effect? ”It’s computer animation intertwined with live action photography,” says Disney’s Heidi Trotta. As long as this category doesn’t turn into a de facto Best Animated Film award, we’re buying it. ODDS 5:1

”Sunshine”’s Rosemary Harris and Jennifer Ehle for Best Supporting Actress
Paramount Classics is asking Academy members to cite this real life mother and daughter, who play the same character at different ages in the period epic, for a joint nomination. Just one little problem: Last we checked, the category wasn’t called Best Supporting Actresses. ”We know it’s not an easy thing to do,” says Paramount Classics copresident David Dinerstein. ”But we believe it’s the right thing to do.” It may also turn out to be a futile thing to do. Says Academy spokesperson Leslie Unger: ”If voters were to enter both of those names on a single line, it would not be considered a valid vote.” Remember Florida. ODDS 1,000,000:1.