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Your weekly TV guide

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Your weekly TV guide

MONDAY, June 12

THE 1900 HOUSE
This Old House meets The Real World in this Brit-produced, four-part docu-stunt. A modern family spends three months living in a London town house reequipped with ”turn of the 20th century” technology — except for all those TV cameras. Sounds intriguing, but too much time is spent fixing the place and picking the guinea pigs. And do we really need to see Mum learning to make her own tampons? C

TUESDAY, June 13

SHAFT MARATHON
He’s a complicated man, and no one understands him but his woman. Yet that still doesn’t explain what the hell he’s doing in Africa! TNT salutes the ’70s blaxploitation hero (played by Richard Roundtree) with airings of all three original films, including the laughable Shaft in Africa. Also on the menu, two episodes of the short-lived 1973 television series. Shut yo’ mouth and watch.

WEDNESDAY, June 14

THE LONGEST YARD SALE
Still looking for that elusive Fonz action figure or Lou Rawls eight-track? There’s a good chance you’ll find ’em (along with countless other doodads and antiques) at the annual 450-mile yard sale stretching alongside U.S. Highway 127 from Kentucky all the way to Alabama. Host Chris Wragge dabbles in shopping and Southern hospitality, while passing on some primo prizes (like that 1903 Victrola phonograph) in this fun yet flimsy bargain hunter’s paradise. B-

THURSDAY, June 15

VH1 LEGENDS: NEIL YOUNG
There are some people — poor souls — who suffer from the delusion that Neil Young can’t sing. But as David Crosby eloquently states here, ”As unusual and different as his voice was, it was immensely communicative.” This too-brief overview of Young’s career does a decent job of accessing the reclusive Canadian singer’s emotions, but there’s just no way to cram a fascinating, four-decade career into one hour, and the result is too abbreviated to be really satisfying. B

FRIDAY, June 16

THE MYSTERY OF CHACO CANYON
Just in time for the summer solstice, Robert Redford narrates this engaging documentary about massive 1,000 year old sandstone structures built by Pueblo ancestors in northwest New Mexico. Don’t despair through the obtuse astronomical jargon; the time-lapse photography and computerized 3-D demonstrations marvelously explain how generations of Chacoans engineered the world’s only known site constructed to mirror perfectly both solar and lunar cycles. And you thought the pyramids were impressive. B+

SATURDAY, June 17

THE MISADVENTURES OF MARGARET
If you found Energizer Bunny Parker Posey grating before, just wait ’til you catch her in this dreadful straight to cable romantic comedy. Posey plays a hyperactively horny author inspired by an 18th-century French diary to start cheating on her husband (Jeremy Northam). But by the time the former indie film queen goes for the lesbian lip lock on friend Brooke Shields, you’ll be well past having any semblance of a gay old time. D-

SUNDAY, June 18

DEADLOCKED
When Bad TV Movies Happen to Good Actors: David Caruso and Charles S. Dutton are intensely talented men, and both deserve much better than this hackneyed claptrap. An ex-prison guard (Dutton) learns his estranged son (the excellently named but minimally skilled Jo D. Jonz) is facing the death penalty, so he takes the jury hostage, and it’s up to prosecutor Ned Stark (Caruso) to negotiate their release. The lazy script traffics in trite dialogue (”My boy is innocent!”) and far-fetched situations (Dutton manages to wrestle not one, but two handguns away from the bailiff). Deadlocked‘s only virtue is its gratifyingly unhappy ending, but getting there is truly a trial. D

SAM PHILLIPS: THE MAN WHO INVENTED ROCK & ROLL
The title of this ”Biography” may be a tad hyperbolic, but then, so is the great Sun Records founder, who, with the invaluable help of colleague Marion Keisker, recognized the promise of Elvis Presley and gave him his first studio time. Working from the impeccable scholarship of writer Peter Guralnick, this careful, intelligent, yet raucous biography captures the elation and daring of proto-rockers like Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and Carl Perkins. A

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