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Oscars 2017
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Mail from our readers

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Mail from our readers

The Friends’ big payout didn’t create enemies among EW readers — most think the sextet are worthy of a whopping $750K an episode. ”If I were generating as much money for my company as they do, I would like to see the money too!” says Darwin Bell of San Francisco. Of course, a few castigated the cast for being ungrateful wretches. ”Remember where you were before Friends and realize where you’d be without it,” writes Drew Brown of Manhattan, Kan. Speaking of friends, somebody is taking the exit of longtime Late Night sidekick Andy Richter even harder than Conan. ”Thanks, EW (and Dan Snierson), for the article and the comfort,” says Ryan Delk of Santa Barbara. ”Andy rules!” There are always reruns, Ryan.

‘Friends’ Till the End
I, for one, am sick and tired of hearing everyone whine about how much the Friends cast are getting paid in their new contract. First of all, if any of us had the opportunity to get that kind of money, we’d pounce on it like a pack of rabid wolverines. But more importantly, it’s not a question of the amount of money they are making — it’s a question of fair wages. The network and the producers and the syndicators are making more than the GNP of some nations off this show. The actors only want their share of the money they are helping generate. So rather than vilify the Friends cast, you ought to be cheering them on for sticking it to the Man! It’s the American labor ethic at its finest!
Burt Dellinger
Hickory, N.C.

The ”all for one and one for all” attitude of the Friends cast is commendable, but I shudder to think that David Schwimmer might have ruined the whole deal for the other five. Schwimmer should have been thanking the others for letting him stay on for the ride. It’s very arrogant to make movies like The Pallbearer and Six Days, Seven Nights and remain a holdout.
Mary Ann Bogumill
Mesa, Ariz.

Show Stoppers
So Ken Tucker thinks it’s impossible to be a fan of both The West Wing and Felicity, partly because the two are scheduled opposite one another? Mr. Tucker’s claim that viewers’ devotion to niche shows keeps audiences of the two shows ”mutually exclusive” is ridiculous. Both of these wonderful shows only highlight the need for a discerning viewer’s most powerful tool: the VCR. If critics and executives would stop trying to analyze demographics and pigeonhole viewers and instead concentrate on developing quality shows, maybe we would have this ”problem” every night.
Elizabeth Mills
Richmond, Ky.

Let me get this straight: Sports Night ranked 45th out of 150 shows — not far behind returning show Spin City (37th) and ahead of returning shows Once and Again (54th) and Two Guys and a Girl (59th). It showed a 10 percent improvement over its first season. And it was canceled?! The guy who bought the fictional Continental Sports Channel in the final episode was right: ”Anybody who can’t make money off of Sports Night should get out of the moneymaking business.”
Chris Rooney
Niskayuna, N.Y.

The Richter Scale
Thank you for the great article on Conan O’Brien’s departing sidekick, Andy Richter. Late Night is one of the wildest, craziest, and funniest shows on TV, and here in Houston it doesn’t come on until 2:10 in the morning. Your article on Andy not only made me laugh but gave me advance notice of an event worth staying up real late for.
Paul Emig
Houston

‘Road’ Rage
Todd Phillips, the director of Road Trip, should apologize to Amy Smart for having her do a nude scene that he imagined would be as memorable as Phoebe Cates’ in Fast Times at Ridgemont High. Miss Smart kept up her end of the bargain, but Phillips didn’t keep his by making the scene even remotely memorable. The worst part is that Phillips himself plays the pervert on the bus who sucks her toes as she sleeps. I think it’s pretty obvious what his intentions were as far as Amy’s nude scene is concerned. It had more to do with his own fantasies than that of any teenage boy.
Barry Meyer
Jersey City, N.J.

Sailor’s Delight
It’s true that the english version of Sailor Moon S is a dog and howls at the moon. But Wook Kim’s throwaway dismissal of the entire Sailor Moon series only shows that he doesn’t get it. The silliness of Sailor Moon enables it to get away with exploring issues like feminine empowerment and even tolerance of homosexuality. I would not describe Sailor Moon as enchantment for ”impressionable 6-year-old girls and creepy middle-aged men.” I am a married, 47-year-old woman, and my 6-year-old son and I genuinely enjoy watching Sailor Moon.
Carol L. Walker
Tampa

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