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Candace Bushnell takes a tumble

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CANDY LANDING Just as Sex and the City author Candace Bushnell is raising her profile by penning a series of ads for luxury jeweler Bulgari, she risked ruining it altogether—literally—at her recent birthday party, where her customary stilettos proved her downfall. In the midst of hobnobbing with Bret Easton Ellis and others, the professional gadabout toppled down a flight of steps, and now five stitches mar her writerly brow. Bushnell’s thinly veiled reportage a clef has peppered the New York Observer less frequently of late, but she’s kept busy shilling for Bulgari and preparing a novel for release from Grove/Atlantic in 1999. The Darren Star-produced HBO movie version of Sex and the City, starring Sarah Jessica Parker, begins taping in March.

PRIMAL FEAR Gavin de Becker, the celebrity security consultant whose The Gift of Fear: Survival Signals That Protect Us From Violence spent four months on the New York Times best-seller list this year, has moved from Little, Brown to The Dial Press after his original publisher balked at his $1 million price tag. The as-yet-untitled project, due out in the spring of ’99, will be a Gift of Fear for juniors, advising ”parents how to protect their children and children how to protect themselves,” says Susan Kamil, Dial’s editorial director.

DENNIS, ANYONE? A John McEnroe book may soon be in the works, provided a publisher lobs up the asking price. ”It’s not a tennis book,” says McEnroe’s agent at IMG, David Chalfant, who, according to sources, has demanded a $1 million bid before allowing publishers to meet with the tennis legend-turned- sports commentator/ art dealer. Titled You Cannot Be Serious, the book would be ”a hybrid of Dennis Miller‘s Rants and John Madden‘s insights into sports and the world,” says Chalfant. ”He’s charming and witty,” says one editor of McEnroe. ”But there aren’t many sports figures worth a million dollars.”

— Alexandra Jacobs and Matthew Flamm

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