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Check out letters from those who agreed with us, and those who didn’t

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CLASH OF THE ‘TITANIC’

Your article on Titanic (#404, Nov. 7) was a stunner! It has been just the sort of fix we Titanic buffs have been waiting for. Surely, James Cameron has gone above and beyond the call of duty in giving us the most visually accurate Titanic ever filmed. Kudos to his hard work and perseverance. If only other directors could lavish that much detail and love on their films.
Justin J. Petersen
petersjj@storm.simpson.edu
Indianola, Iowa

It’s nice to read about someone like James Cameron immersing himself so completely in his work. So what if Titanic cost $200 million? Speed 2 cost around $140 million and has nothing to show for it. The fact of the matter is, directors who are perfectionists, like Cameron and Stanley Kubrick, deliver the goods — beyond a reasonable doubt.
Erik Friedman
Oakland

STOP ‘SEIN’

In regards to ”Early Warning, Sein?” I think it can be summed up with one word: greed. In past years, I could hardly watch an episode of this great show without rolling on the floor laughing. The story lines were downright comical, as was the cast of the show. Now these people don’t even seem to be enjoying themselves. A 10th season? I’m not even watching this one anymore.
John Poulin
johnp@nh.ultranet.com
Rochester, N.H.

When NBC negotiated the Seinfeld cast’s new megabuck contracts, did their attorneys forget to include a clause requiring them to be funny?
Phil Edgerly
EdgerlyDesign@worldnet.att.net
Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Back when its creators were (intelligently) considering whether to end Seinfeld with its seventh season, Jerry used to say that keeping the show on past its welcome would be like staying at a party too late. At a party, you don’t want to leave too early, but you definitely don’t want to be the last one to leave. Without Jerry noticing, Seinfeld has now turned into that last guest at the party.
Allex Sandel
alex@rea-alp.com
Alexandria, Minn.

‘TOONING UP

Thank you for your article (”World War ‘Toon”) on the heated competition in the animation industry. It is one thing for Disney to continue to release stale, formulaic animated movies. It is another thing entirely for the company to prevent anyone else from entering and expanding the boundaries of this medium. Feature-length animation’s potential has still barely been tapped, and if the Mouse House is not going to contribute to its artistic growth, then it should get out of the way and let others have a shot!
Adam Prosser
Oshawa, Ontario

It’s about time that someone realized that animation needs to diversify from the usual song-and-dance routine that Disney and the other studios offer up. If animation wants to continue to flourish, the subject matter and style need to diversify the way Japanese animation has, with its hard-edged sci-fi films like Ghost in the Shell and Akira. Not only will companies that vary their output avoid making a Disney clone, but they’ll be offering up something that the audience hasn’t seen before.
Jason Glick
Riverside, Calif.

CORRECTIONS: Bean is rated PG-13 (Movies). The recent Almost-Full Monty contest held in a New York City HMV record store attracted 12 participants (Biz).