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Wesley Snipes, Pierce Brosnan and Keanu Reeves: Entertainment news for December 1, 1995

Here are the celebrities that made headlines this week

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In A Nut’s Shell: In The Fan, Wesley Snipes plays a baseball player haunted by an obsessed fan, but the actor would have preferred the psycho role. ”I really wanted to be the stalker,” says Snipes, who went so far as to menace director Tony Scott. ”I drove by Tony’s house a couple of times and asked if I could have the role, but he was rather adamant about me playing the baseball character.” The part went to Robert De Niro, who, after Taxi Driver and Cape Fear, is no stranger to sociopaths. Snipes, however, remains hell-bent on playing a crazy, ”to get my juices flowing,” and harbors no fear of running into a real one. ”Nah,” he says. ”I’m not on the Internet.” —Cindy Pearlman

I Spy: For the next Bond adventure, Goldeneye‘s Pierce Brosnan hopes to shake and stir the spy series just a bit. ”I will have more of a voice in the next movies,” claims Brosnan, who’s contracted to play 007 at least two more times. On his wish list: Anthony Hopkins as a villain and Sharon Stone as a Bond girl. Brosnan would also like to see the films go in an edgier direction. ”We need young filmmakers who are going to push the buttons,” adds Brosnan. ”I’d love Quentin Tarantino to direct. He would have the courage to [take] Bond where he hasn’t gone before.” Brosnan has been rewarded for his attention to detail. BMW was so thankful to him for driving its new Z3 roadster in the film that it donated one to the actor for a charity auction. Did its headlights spit daggers? Says Brosnan, ”That’s an upgrade you must work out with the dealer.” —Cindy Pearlman

Etc.: Keanu Reeves accomplished many things in 1995, and he hasn’t finished. On Dec. 19 he hosts the CBS Schoolbreak Special Children Remember the Holocaust, a documentary on Nazi Germany. Director-producer Mark Gordon (Speed) chose him because ”the piece is geared toward young people, and they need to see someone they respect to get into something.”