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DREW, A PICTURE

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It must be something in the water. On the deck of the same South Beach, Miami pool where Madonna got slick with Naomi Campbell on the pages of Sex, another sensual display, this one starring Drew Barrymore, is just getting warmed up. While two Brad Pitt look-alikes strut around in wet undies, the rest of the Drew Crew-15 scurrying stylists, photographers, grips, and caterers-is getting ready for the final day of its week-long Guess? shoot. Under a crisp white tent, sporting cutoffs, a T-shirt, and enough ‘tude to fill all the pools in the panhandle, Barrymore, 18, is chain-smoking as layers of ultrachic M.A.C. makeup perfect her baby-face-with-a-bad-dye-job look. ”Dirty white trash mixed with glamour-a really good combination,” she says. Drew’s ‘tude, however, isn’t doing much to help her adjust to modeling. ”It’s so hard for me to look at myself,” says Barrymore, ”and think, ‘Yeah, I’m sexy, I’ve got it going on.”’ In fact, at 5’4” and 98 pounds, Barrymore is not the most obvious choice to follow Claudia Schiffer and Anna Nicole Smith as Guess? robo-babes. But Paul Marciano-the company’s president, director of advertising, and brother of CEO Georges-was looking to make the Guess? girl more of a ’90s grunge waif. He chose the Recovering Little Girl Lost at the urging of fashion photographer Wayne Maser and stylist Lori Goldstein. ”I was totally seduced by her,” says Marciano. What Barrymore lacks in height and cup size she makes up for with the rebel-yell sexpot image of Poison Ivy and The Amy Fisher Story. The theme for today’s shoot, photographed by Maser, who first captured the sultry Guess? vignettes, will be Barrymore’s jailbait allure. ”I don’t think we’re exploiting anything,” says stylist Goldstein. ”This morning she had her hair in a ponytail and she looked like she was 10 years old, but you talk to her and she has already lived this whole life. She’s not just some Tori Spelling.” Although Barrymore comes custom-equipped with three crucial accessories- razor-edge eyebrows, black roots, and the occasional tattoo-giving her that ”real” glamour-grunge look takes as much time as a wheel alignment. The anatomy of Drew’s metamorphosis goes like this: *Enter makeup diva Ariella, who starts with eye shadow in a shade called Bark. Then she adds M.A.C.’s Lola highlighter to the eyes, but no mascara, ”to make them softer.” Next comes only a little blush (”so her freckles come through”), and finally, the punctuation mark-two bloody shades of lipstick, Rubine and Paramount. ”It’s more like the ’30s or ’40s,” says Ariella. ”A little dramatic, but not a hard look.” *Next, using fingers and an industrial-strength curling iron, hairstylist Orlando Pita spends 45 minutes to make Drew’s tresses look ”disheveled-like not much was done,” he says. Pita admits he expected hissy fits but reports that Barrymore is a model model. ”She says she always gives hairdressers a really hard time because she’s really insecure about her hair,” he says. ”But she’s been nice.” *Ninety minutes of preparation later, it’s nearly show time. Barrymore looks ripe in a denim bustier and shorts. ”She doesn’t look great covered up,” says Goldstein. ”She’s very curvy, but she’s tiny, so you want to show as much of that as possible.” Leaning on a swing, Barrymore gives the camera her best spank-me pout as the sun blazes through the haze. She obviously enjoys being the center of attention, though she still finds modeling weird. ”When my publicist called and said Paul (Marciano) wanted me, I freaked,” gushes Barrymore, who says she rejected offers from Pepe Jeans, Gap, and Capezio. Now reality is setting in. ”The other models are like six- foot-tall, drop-dead beautiful. People are going to look at my ass and go, ‘Why did they do this?”’ America will be able to judge for itself in September, when the new images will be unveiled. By then she’ll be shooting Tamra Davis’ female Western Bad Girls, with no more modeling for the time being. Not that she wouldn’t mind posing, but it might be too late. ”I’m getting wrinkles already,” she says. ”I saw them and started stressing.”

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