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Entertainment news for Nov. 8, 1991

Mary McDonnell, Jacqueline Susann, and Martin Scorsese’s ”Cape Fear” made headlines this week

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Movies:
Alec Baldwin isn’t the only one feeling the pinch at cost-conscious Paramount. Partly for budgetary reasons and because he asked for too many perks, the studio dropped Baldwin in September as the lead in Patriot Games, the Hunt for Red October sequel, replacing him with Harrison Ford. Now Mary McDonnell (Dances With Wolves) is out of the picture, and Anne Archer (Fatal Attraction) is in, as Dr. Cathy Ryan, the hero’s wife. ”The differences (with Paramount) were over money,” says McDonnell’s agent, John Kelly. So McDonnell has taken another offer — playing opposite Robert Redford in Universal’s upcoming Sneakers. · Anthony Quinn will portray Boris Yeltsin in Heroes of August, an international coproduction about the failed Soviet coup, which will start filming in Moscow in 1993 with American leads. Set for release in ’94, the $20 million film will follow the lives of three young Yeltsin supporters who were killed and the army major whose division defended Yeltsin….

Video:
One for the no-one-ever-noticed-and-now-it’s-too-late department: Would you believe a video package that reads ”Jacqueline Susann’s The Last Tycoon”? Somebody did. Because that’s what the sticker says on Paramount’s 1985 home video release of the film version of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s last novel. Susann also gets sticker credit for Harold Robbins’ The Carpetbaggers. It seems the two films and an actual Susann work, Once Is Not Enough, were all part of a video series that the company produced, but some internal mix-up resulted in the incorrect labeling. Paramount’s official response is, ”Oops.”…

Music:
Gregory Peck, Robert Mitchum, and Martin Balsam aren’t the only ones returning in Martin Scorsese’s remake of their 1962 thriller hit, Cape Fear. The director has another surprise: He’s using the original Bernard Herrmann score, re-orchestrated by Elmer Bernstein (The Grifters). Herrmann, best known for his screeching Psycho violins, collaborated on Scorsese’s Taxi Driver (1976). In a Hitchcockian finale, the composer finished Taxi Driver‘s score and died a few hours later.